Yamaha r6 2004




Yamaha r6 2004

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  • For a supersports machine that's as easy to ride to the shops as it is round Donington Park the Yamaha YZF-R6 comes close to spot-on.

    Cycle World has specs and reviews on the YZF-R6. This Yamaha is made in Japan with an MSRP of $8, It has a 6 speed manual transmission.

    Features and Benefits NEW FOR Remapped fuel injection for improved response throughout the powerband. Larger volume exhaust.

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Then again, most owners will probably just file it away in a box somewhere safe while they fit aftermarket cans anyway. Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs. As a track day bike I can think of very little better. Curved radiator follows the contour of the frame and bodywork for an ultra-sleek look and excellent cooling performance.

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Yamaha YZF-R6 | Sport Rider

    And there's even more for An ingenious suction-piston fuel injection system re-mapped for '04 , among other things, endows it with amazingly good road manners at low and medium engine speeds.

    A 15, rpm redline. Redesigned exhaust canister providing improved exhaust flow for This one is pure sportbike, designed from the asphalt up to achieve a delicate, sublime blend of handling and horsepower, finesse and feel, hyperactive agility and laser-beam predictability. Absolute leading-edge technology takes tangible form in the R6's light and rigid DeltaBox III frame - an almost seamless piece of alloy artisanship that allowed the engineers to put strength - and the revvy 4-cylinder - exactly where they belong.

    Yamaha r6 2004

    From there, all sorts of good things flow. We put all our experience into this one; the harder you ride it, the more you'll extract. Road test by Simon Bradley It seems hard to believe that the R6 has already been on the market for five years. Its arrival back in was slightly overshadowed by the simultaneous launch of the ultra exotic and appropriately expensive R7 race replica.

    But despite the in house competition, the little proved to be the bike that everybody really wanted to know about after the celebrity fuss had died down over its bigger brother.

    Yamaha r6 2004

    The R6 has always been a big hitter for its size while managing to remain a featherweight at the same time. Muscle, it seems, does not always equal bulk. This, the latest incarnation, continues that trend with a claimed bhp allied to a dry weight of just kg.

    The fairing with its row of headlights reminds me of a grinning frog, and makes an interesting comparison to the alternative approaches to aerodynamics taken by other manufacturers who are making their bikes noses pointier and higher. The tank is a good size and the seat is enormous. Quite simply, it looks stunning, especially in the limited edition yellow and black we had on test. The only thing I was less than totally blown away by is the huge and, I feel, rather unattractive silencer.

    Then again, most owners will probably just file it away in a box somewhere safe while they fit aftermarket cans anyway. The four headlights, the black wheels and frame all look great. The LED tail lights are beautifully integrated. As you may be able to gather, I was impressed. But more importantly, so was pretty well everyone else. Even that most damning of critics — my 12 year old daughter — gave her unqualified approval. So no complaints there. But of course, even the best looking bike in the world would be no good if the riding experience were horrible.

    Yamaha r6 2004

    Not even a little bit. Sitting on the R6 gives the game away. But more on that later. Pulling away is a forceful reminder that this is still only a If you want to make anything more than pedestrian progress you need to use a few revs and dance on the very slick gearbox a bit.

    I tended to short-shift at around 13,rpm out of town if I was pressing on a bit. Again, a fruitier end can would probably resolve that while adjusting the shift light to 13, would mean that you changed at leak power and dropped back near to peak torque. A happy situation to be in. Once spinning, the engine is a peach, with a crisp and smooth reaction to the throttle, very little vibration and an eagerness to rev that has to be seen to be believed.

    Yamaha r6 2002 and Yamaha r6 2004



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