Buick concept cars 1950s




Buick concept cars 1950s

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  • Buick Centurion Concept Car (I saw this Concept Car at The Sloan Museum in Flint, MI). Buick enthusiasts will recognize the.

    In the s, the American economy was booming, the suburbs were sprawling, and automobiles took on newfound importance. At the same time, inventions.

    While Henry Leland's Osceola is considered the world's first concept car that actually made it into production, the Buick Y Job is another.

    The concept car concept is translated as "the idea of a car". This is a kind of prototype car, which tests people's reactions to new technologies being introduced, design solutions, etc. In its original form, prototypes are never launched into mass production.

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick Centurion 23 December by Karl Smith. The front seats would automatically retract to allow for ease of entry. Consider Edsel, arguably the biggest automotive flop of all time, whose s and s Edsel concept cars came too late to save the brand. Narrowing this list down to just a few cars felt a little like picking a favorite child. The whole composition formed a scowling shark-like face that would preview the aggressive look of the Buicks at the end of the s.

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Fabulous Concept Cars From The s

    All of these were displayed on elaborate moving sets with performers and bands that made the old-fashioned motor show seem Victorian by comparison. At the Motorama GM introduced a host of new concepts, some of which became classics. Perhaps the best known of these is the Buick Centurion, a radical four-seat sports sedan intended to preview a near-future Buick.

    The Centurion featured a fibreglass body, sculpted to seem part rocket, part jet fighter. The sweeping side treatment of the two-tone paint made helped define the car as a Buick, but everything else was new.

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    The front end sloped dramatically downward in contrast to the more upright GM products of the day, and joined the bumper in an integrated composition, foreshadowing front end treatments of a generation later. Flanking the grille were the headlights, set deeply in nacelles that were an extension of the body. The whole composition formed a scowling shark-like face that would preview the aggressive look of the Buicks at the end of the s.

    The two-tone paint with its brilliant red-over-white treatment, made the car appear lighter, especially with the whitewall tires. The glasshouse was just that — a glass canopy roof, the fantasy cockpit that was the dream of every jet fighter-inspired designer of the s.

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    Above this, integrated into the body, was a back-up camera which replaced all the mirrors in the car. This horizontal treatment of the tailfins was unique for the time and in a sense were not fins but wings, reinforcing the aircraft imagery of the car.

    Whatever you want to call them, they were among the most elegant and refined version of this design trend ever created, and previewed the forthcoming Chevrolets and Buicks.

    The interior was accessed through traditional doors with glazing integrated into the glass canopy. The front seats would automatically retract to allow for ease of entry. Once seated, passengers and driver could both marvel at the minimal composition of the instrument panel.

    Buick concept cars 1950s

    The mirror screen was located in the center of the IP, while an enormous chrome nacelle projected outward, containing transmission and environmental controls.

    The steering column originally cantilevered off of this nacelle, although that was later altered. Chrome trim pieces descended from the nacelle under the IP and framed the top of the passenger floorboard area. The whole assembly was a glamourised version of the fighter jet cockpit — more Palm Springs than Edwards Lake in character.

    Incredible Concept Cars From the 1950s



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